Pogue's Pages The Web's richest resource about New York Times Columnist, Missing Manual publisher, and Emmy-winning CBS news correspondent, David Pogue Photo of David Pogue
Bio & Photos:
Speaking Inquiries
Photos
Bio & Photos > Speaking Inquiries

Speaking Inquiries

I love speaking to groups of all sizes! Each year, I present lively, funny keynote talks at about 50 educators' conferences, government agencies, nonprofit trade shows, and other confabs.

Here's an 18-minute sample, just so you know what you’re in for.

At the end of each talk, I usually sit at the piano and perform a couple of my famous tech-industry song parodies (like “Don’t Cry For Me, Cupertino” and “I Got YouTube”). If you can arrange to have a piano on hand--real or plastic--it makes a rousing finale that sends the audience out on a high note. (You can hear three of them in the video linked above, and dozens more, captured by cellphones in the audience, are floating around on YouTube.)

For information on fees and availability, contact me here. (And note that I can't accept paid engagements from companies whose products I may review in my column.)

The New Self-Diagnosis Tech: Do We Want This?

Consumer access to medical information from the Web has always been a blessing and a curse—and it’s about to get a lot worse/better.

A new era of apps and devices is turning amateurs into self-testing, self-diagnosing medical hobbyists. The “quantified self” wristbands that measure activity and sleep are only the beginning. One new device records pulse transit time, heart rate and electrical activity, oxygen saturation, and temperature in 10 seconds. Another, in conjunction with your smartphone, does an instant urinalysis to report on pregnancy complications, preeclampsia, kidney failure and urinary tract infections.

Can patients be trusted to use these devices properly? Will they be tempted to skip out on proper medical care? Will they challenge their doctor’s advice? And what about privacy?

In this intriguing, entertaining presentation, NY Times tech columnist David Pogue explores these questions, provides some answers—and demonstrates some of these new gadgets and apps, so you’ll know what you’re up against.

Science, Schmience: Why America’s Failing Science—& How We Can Turn It Around

The STEM fields (science, tech, engineering, math) drive America’s economy; it’s no accident that Apple, a tech company, is the world’s biggest corporation. Science and tech fuel the country’s innovation, commerce, defense, and business.

But American test scores, graduation rates, and STEM dominance have been declining steadily for 20 years. Fewer than a third of elementary- and high-school students have a solid grasp of science. Half of American college students start out majoring in a technical subject, but somehow, only 470,000 graduate in those majors. What’s going on? And how can we compete if we don’t fix the situation, fast?

The problem turns out to be a long chain with many broken links: financial, political, cultural, and educational ones. Our own government continues to slash science budgets for the NSF, NASA, and NIH. Brutal first-year “sink or swim” science classes wind up squeezing out freshmen. There aren’t enough good jobs awaiting graduates, let alone high-paying ones.

There are efforts to turn the battleship around. President Obama has launched a $260 million program to train 10,000 new math and science teachers. Universities are overhauling traditional dry lectures with hands-on projects, design courses, and ungraded freshmen classes.

But is coddling the answer? After all, our competition overseas offers no such easy ways out. Science is hard; it has always required effort. Could it be that the problem is not with our programs, but with ourselves?

In this fascinating, cutting-edge presentation, PBS “Nova” science host (and NY Times tech columnist) David Pogue looks at our chances for turning around America’s science future.

Is Our Technology Killing Us?

Modern technology has transformed every corner of our lives: business, relationships, learning. But we’ve immersed ourselves in digital tools—the tablets, touchscreen phones, ubiquitous Internet—without much concern for the potential dangers.

It’s no secret that our children are dying on the highways as they text while driving. But what about cellphone radiation causing brain cancer? What about the obesity epidemic? What about studies that show how the multiple-gadget multitasking habits of college kids are causing permanent changes in their brains?

Nobody stands in such a sweet spot of science and technology as David Pogue, tech columnist for the New York Times and host of PBS’s “NOVA” series. In this fascinating, surprisingly entertaining talk, he’ll bring you the very latest scientific research on these techno-dangers. He’ll tell you what’s genuinely worth worrying about, and why there’s also cause for hope.

The Web Culture Crash Course

You've seen the Star Wars kid, right? You know about Mentos and Coke, Where's the Chapstick, and Evolution of Dance? You've checked in with FourSquare, you're following some good people on Twitter, and your Facebook page is up to date?

If not, you may find yourself feeling slightly out of the loop when it comes to what's happening online. (You wouldn't be alone- it moves fast.) Leave it to New York Times columnist David Pogue to bring you up to date. He'll demystify the online tools worth knowing (like Facebook, Twitter, FourSquare, LinkedIn), show you the YouTube videos that everyone should know, and, above all, help you assess which of this stuff are just teenage fads, and which have meaning for your current career, social life, and personal time.

David Pogue's Tech Update 2010 (2011, 2012...)

The very simple premise here: If you want to know what of importance is going on in the world of technology, New York Times columnist David Pogue is the perfect tour guide.

This talk is constantly updated to represent what's going on in tech right now, whether it's the gadgets themselves, amazing free Internet services, or social-media shockwaves. The talk was originally designed for groups who hire David to return to their conferences each year, so they'd be sure to see fresh, funny material every time - but it turns out to be just a great standalone, highly entertaining crash course in what's worth knowing about at the time of your event.

Disruptive Tech: What’s New, What’s Coming, and How It Will Change Everything

As the New York Times’s tech reviewer, David Pogue has a front-row seat for observing the blazing-fast torrent of new inventions. Hundreds of gadgets and technologies come down the pike every year, and plenty get lots of press--but most of it’s junk.

But in this fast, funny presentation, Pogue will stick his neck out to predict which will actually cause major, disruptive changes. He’ll display, discuss, and even demonstrate the technological advances--in personal entertainment, cellular tech, Web 2.0, and more--that will have the most impact on society in the coming years.

Web 2.0, Social Media, and Other Buzzwords

What do YouTube, MySpace, eBay, and Craigslist have in common? They're all part of "Web 2.0," in which a Web site's material is supplied by its visitors.

What do blogs, vlogs, and podcasts have in common? They're all new ways for individuals--and even corporations--to express themselves online.

In this head-spinning talk, David Pogue, the New York Times's most popular blogger (and first video blogger), helps to make sense of the explosively expanding realm of Web 2.0 and all kinds of 'casting. He'll advise both individuals and companies on how to exploit these live-wire technologies, supply some horrifying and hilarious real-world stories, and hint at the future, the pitfalls, and the rewards of these revolutionary new channels.

Why Products Fail

In his 10 years reviewing tech products for the New York Times, David Pogue has seen his share of turkeys. Many were so obviously failures, a kindergartener could have spotted them. Sometimes the problem is design. But more often, it's procedural, having to do with misfires in communication, PR, marketing or groupthink. In this entertaining talk, he'll revisit some horrifying disasters from his journalism career - and, more important, pick apart how things went off the tracks.

Dave’s Mobile Show-and-Tell

David Pogue reviews over 200 products a year for the New York Times. If anyone can identify the breakthroughs, he can.

In this lively presentation--half talk, half magic show--David will present and actually demonstrate the latest and most amazing mobile gadgets, and offer his mini-critiques of each. The assortment changes monthly, of course, but past presentations have included the cellphone that offers unlimited free calls via Wi-Fi; the pocket camera that beams photos instantly onto Flickr (the photo-sharing Web site); the music player that downloads wirelessly from a catalog of 2 million songs; a folding memory card for cameras that eliminates the need for wires or card readers; the secret of getting Directory Assistance for free on your cellphone (rather than $2 per call from your carrier); the latest breakthroughs in speech recognition; and, of course, the iPhone.

Prepare to have your mind blown--and your credit card stressed.

The Power of Simplicity

Why are consumers so fed up with their computers? “Software rage” has become an epidemic, help lines are flooded, and people are flinging their machines out the window in frustration.

More often than not, the problem is the software design itself--the interface. The design of programs and Web sites grows in importance every day. Getting it right--packing a lot of features, the right way, into a small screen area--is extremely difficult, and the masters of the art are few and far between. But David Pogue, who analyzes software design each week in his New York Times column, has found some fascinating real-world examples that illustrate both clever solutions and horrifying failures. He’ll also look forward to interface design of the future--speech, animation, and other innovations--as we move into an era of both much bigger and much smaller screens.

The Megapixel Challenge

If you believe the marketing, the quality of a digital camera is determined by the number of megapixels it has. 10 megapixels must be better than 5, right?

In this hilarious talk, David Pogue relives his four-month quest to determine, once and for all, just how important megapixels are in a digital camera. His adventure wound up involving the Discovery Channel, the New York Times, the technical director of Professional Photography magazine, 100 passersby in Times Square, the way, and over 500 angry bloggers. You’ll walk away with a new understanding of how cameras work--and the unpublicized measurement that REALLY determines the photo quality you’ll get.

Blogs vs. Journalism

It’s been said, over and over again, that blogs unleash the power of the citizen journalist. A new day has dawned, when news can hit the Web instantly, long before the mainstream media gets around to it. That, after all, is how so many of the great scandal stories have broken in the last few years.

But is blogger journalism actually journalism? David Pogue, who writes a column for the New York Times, obviously has an opinion--but it might not be the one you expect. In this funny, thought-provoking talk, he tries to pin down the pros and the cons of the blogger as journalist, as well as the journalist as blogger--and offers a few suggestions that might give the public the best of both worlds.

Digital Photography: No "Negatives"?

Anyone who already knows photography has a huge advantage when it comes to digital cameras--a familiarity with principles of light and composition, for example. At the same time, the “digital” part is a whole new world, entailing a new set of skills. In this entertaining presentation, New York Times columnist (and digital-camera reviewer) David Pogue offers a concise, meaty, funny crash course for the photographer who wants to exploit the digital possibilities without going quietly mad. Includes an updated glimpse at what’s new and what’s coming in digicams, plus workarounds for the ever-shorter list of digital drawbacks.

The Digital Generation Comes Of Age

For the last 20 years, computers and technology have been part of the everyday curriculum for a generation or two of digitally privileged kids--and, as they become the majority, it's showtime.

As computer-literate children become America's new leaders, visionaries, and designers, how will their digital upbringing affect society and culture? New York Times technology columnist David Pogue takes a thoughtful, funny look at how the tidal wave will hit as the digital generation enters prime time--what we'll gain, what we'll lose, and what beliefs and approaches will shift into something we've never seen before.

PR and Web 2.0

I'm the press. I’m one of the guys public-relations people work with, or maybe I should say work on. I get about 50 pitch emails a day.

This talk, geared for PR professionals, also offers a few of the most hilariously bad, and impressively good, pitches I've seen in my days at the Times.

Breakout Sessions

I’m also happy to teach master classes, seminars, or “breakout sessions” on topics I know and love:

  • Mac OS X Leopard
  • iPhone
  • Google Secrets
  • Windows Vista
  • iPhoto
  • Digital Photography

Hire me for a keynote, get a breakout session or two for free! :)

Pogue's Posts
Click here to read today's blog entry
Now Shipping!
Pogue's newest books:

Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Mavericks Edition

Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Mavericks Edition
By David Pogue
Amazon
Barnes & Noble

Mac OS X:  The Missing Manual, Mavericks Edition

Mac OS X: The Missing Manual, Mavericks Edition
By David Pogue
Amazon
Barnes & Noble

Windows 8.1:  The Missing Manual

Windows 8.1: The Missing Manual
By David Pogue
Amazon
Barnes & Noble

iPhone: The Missing Manual, 7th Edition

iPhone: The Missing Manual, 7th Edition
By David Pogue
Amazon
Barnes & Noble

Windows 8: The Missing Manual

Windows 8: The Missing Manual
By David Pogue
Amazon
Barnes & Noble

iPhone: The Missing Manual, 6th Edition

iPhone: The Missing Manual, 6th Edition
By David Pogue
Amazon
Barnes & Noble

Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Mountain Lion Edition

Mac OS X: The Missing Manual, Mountain Lion Edition
By David Pogue
Amazon
Barnes & Noble

Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Lion Edition

Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Lion Edition
By David Pogue
Amazon
Barnes & Noble

Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Lion Edition

iPhone: The Missing Manual, Fifth Edition
By David Pogue
Amazon
Barnes & Noble

Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Lion Edition

Mac OS X: The Missing Manual, Lion Edition
By David Pogue
Amazon
Barnes & Noble

Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Leopard Edition

iPhone 4: The Missing Manual
By David Pogue
Amazon
Barnes & Noble

Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Leopard Edition

Windows 7: The Missing Manual
By David Pogue
Amazon
Barnes & Noble

Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Leopard Edition

Abby Carnelia's
One and Only Magical Power
By David Pogue
Amazon
Barnes & Noble

Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Leopard Edition

The World According
to Twitter
By David Pogue
Amazon
Barnes & Noble

Mac OS X: The Missing Manual, Leopard Edition

Mac OS X: The Missing Manual, Snow Leopard Edition
By David Pogue
Amazon
Barnes & Noble

Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Leopard Edition

Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Snow Leopard Edition
By David Pogue
Amazon
Barnes & Noble

iPhone: The Missing Manual, Second Edition

iPhone: The Missing Manual, Third Edition
By David Pogue
Amazon
Barnes & Noble

David Pogue's Digital Photography: The Missing Manual

David Pogue's Digital Photography: The Missing Manual
Amazon
Barnes & Noble

iPhoto '08: The Missing Manual

iPhoto '11: The Missing Manual
By David Pogue
Amazon
Barnes & Noble

iMovie 11 & iDVD: The Missing Manual

iMovie 11 & iDVD: The Missing Manual
By David Pogue
Amazon
Barnes & Noble
LOTS of new titles have just gone half-price! Half price Pogue books, autographed if you like, now include Missing Manuals for iPhoto 5, iMovie 5 & iDVD, GarageBand 2, and more!
Details here.
Subscribe to the Poguefeed
Subscribe to the XML RSS feed
Click the button above to have my newest columns delivered to your favorite RSS reader each week!
My Toyota Corolla has My Toyota Corolla has 52894 miles on it miles on it.